The 2014 SHIFT Roundtable on Land Conservation, Wilderness Advocacy & Human-Powered Outdoor Recreation

The SHIFT Roundtable on Land Conservation, Wilderness Advocacy & Human-Powered Outdoor Recreation, held at the National Museum of Wildlife Art on October 9, 2014, brought together leaders in conservation, wilderness advocacy, and outdoor recreation to explore the creation of stronger, more enduring, and more united coalitions among conservation, sustainability, and outdoor recreation advocates in order to help usher in a new generation of conservation champions. The Roundtable featured two dozen conservation and outdoor recreation leaders from around the West in a forum that identified the following:

  1. Regulation is ok if fair, consensus- and science-based
  2. Educational/ambassador programs work
  3. Funding for land managers is key
  4. Demographics are changing
  5. Principles of engagement need to be defined to help us avoid conflict, stereotypes and vilifying

Regulation is ok

  • self-regulation doesn’t work
  • resources vs values/experience
  • Participatory regulation is best
  • Systems for rationing (fees, permits)
  • Fairness based on science
  • Zoning precautionary principle

Education ambassador programs work

  • Ambassador programs build future constituencies

Funding for land managers is key

  • Values of recreation-need to focus
  • Need for better management

Demographics are changing

  • Evolving structure of conservation
  • Recreation and education of young’uns
  • Cycle of life

Principles of engagement that can help us avoid conflict, stereotypes and vilifying

  • Dialogue in advance (before blowing up or talking to the press)
  • build relationships
  • avoid identity politics
  • avoid stereotypes
  • cultivate leadership
  • communication with movement
  • communication with public
  • partnerships are key
  • Ground rules for collaborations
  • Eyes on the prize
  • Don’t personalize


 
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